When, Where, How and Why to Change Your Vehicle’s Oil

The Car Care Council reminds motorists that basic vehicle maintenance is an easy, inexpensive way to prolong the life of vehicles and avoid costly repairs down the road.

“When thinking about vehicle maintenance, regular oil changes likely come to mind first,” said Rich White, executive director, Car Care Council. “A quick review of the why, when, where and how of changing your vehicle’s oil is a good way to see the value of basic auto care.”

Why
Motor oil lubricates the moving parts in your engine, preventing wear by keeping the engine clean, removing contaminants and regulating engine temperature to prevent overheating. Neglecting to check and change your vehicle’s oil can lead to expensive repairs, including engine failure.

When
Check your vehicle owner’s manual; most will recommend changing the oil every 3,000 to 5,000 miles. However, other factors such as harsh weather conditions, driving in stop-and-go traffic or on dusty/dirt roads, towing a trailer, driving at high speeds and the age of your vehicle can all bring down this time interval, making it a safe bet to have the oil checked at the lower end of the recommended interval.

Where
An oil change performed by a professional technician is a quick, low-cost vehicle service. When taking your car in for maintenance or repairs, be sure that the shop employs ASE certified technicians. ASE certification means that the technicians take their training seriously and have passed tests to demonstrate their skills.

How
Do-it-yourselfers can access the Car Care Council’s website for an instructional video by Driverside on how to change your vehicle’s oil.

To help drivers “be car care aware,” the Car Care Council has many free tools available at www.carcare.org, including a free 80-page Car Care Guide and a customized service schedule with email reminders to make it easy to follow a routine auto care program.

The Car Care Council is the source of information for the “Be Car Care Aware” consumer education campaign promoting the benefits of regular vehicle care, maintenance and repair to consumers. For a copy of the council’s Car Care Guide or for more information, visit www.carcare.org.

SOURCE Car Care Council

Easy Steps to Better Gas Mileage

Save-Gas-Beyond-the-Pump1With the average price of gas dipping below two dollars per gallon for the first time since 2009, many motorists have been seeing a real savings at the pump. Putting some of that savings toward basic auto care can lead to more miles per gallon and, in turn, more savings, says the non-profit Car Care Council.

The Car Care Council encourages motorists to be car care aware and perform these five simple steps to improve fuel economy and save money.

  1. Check Tire Pressure: Keep tires properly inflated and improve gas mileage by up to 3.3 percent.
  2. Use the Right Motor Oil: Improve gas mileage by 1 to 2 percent by using the grade of motor oil recommended by the manufacturer.
  3. Replace Clogged Air Filters: Replacing clogged air filters on older vehicles can improve fuel economy and will improve performance and acceleration on all vehicles.
  4. Check Engine Performance: Keep your engine running efficiently and improve gas mileage by an average of 4 percent.
  5. Fix It: Addressing a serious maintenance problem, like a faulty oxygen sensor, can improve mileage by as much as 40 percent, according to www.fueleconomy.gov.

“Proactive vehicle maintenance is a motorist’s best money saving tip,” said Rich White, executive director, Car Care Council. “Routine auto care not only helps save on fuel costs, but it helps identify small issues so they can be serviced before they become bigger and more costly to repair.”

To help motorists increase fuel economy and take better care of their vehicles, the Car Care Council offers valuable tools on its website, including a free personalized schedule and email reminder service.

The Car Care Council is the source of information for the “Be Car Care Aware” consumer education campaign promoting the benefits of regular vehicle care, maintenance and repair to consumers. For a free copy of the council’s popular Car Care Guide or for more information, visit www.carcare.org.

Use Your Spare Time to Check Your Tires

The Car Care Council urges vehicle owners to inspect their tires for wear and tear, as well as check tire pressure and alignment.

According to a national survey conducted by the Rubber Manufacturers Association, only 17 percent of drivers are considered “tire smart” and know the correct way to check their tire pressure.

“Underinflated tires are under stress and will eventually wear unevenly, making them a safety hazard, not to mention an added expense since the worn out tires will have to be replaced sooner,” said Rich White, executive director, Car Care Council. “Properly inflated tires will not only help keep you safe on the road, but will improve gas mileage and performance.”

The Car Care Council recommends that vehicle owners check the pressure of all tires, including the spare, on a monthly basis and more often during colder weather. Tires should be inflated to recommended pressure levels, rotated every 6,000 miles to promote uniform tire wear and be replaced if worn or damaged.

The penny test is a popular and simple way to check tire tread. If you see Lincoln’s head above the tread, than it is time for new tires. In addition, the tread should be checked for uneven or irregular wear as well as cuts or bruises along sidewalls.

“Tires are such an important safety issue that you can’t take their condition lightly,” continued White. “Routinely checking tire balance and wheel alignment will reduce tire wear and improve handling.”

The Car Care Council is the source of information for the “Be Car Care Aware” consumer education campaign promoting the benefits of regular vehicle care, maintenance and repair to consumers. For a free copy of the council’s 80-page Car Care Guide or for more information, visit www.carcare.org.

 

SOURCE Car Care Council